Hen Harrier Project

The Hen Harrier is one of Ireland’s most threatened birds of prey

IRD Duhallow, in collaboration with National Parks and Wildlife Service, are embarking on one of the most exciting wildlife projects in some time, following four young Hen Harriers by means of lightweight satellite tags as they make their respective journeys in life.

The Hen Harrier is one of Ireland’s most spectacular and special birds of prey, yet is also one of our most threatened species. IRD Duhallow promotes awareness, research, understanding and protection of our local environment and when it comes to nationally and internationally important species such as the Hen Harrier, we feel a particular duty to help ensure they remain a sight on our landscape as they always have been. Advances in modern technology have enabled us to progress this cutting edge research with National Parks and Wildlife Service, using state-of-the-art satellite trackers.

The travels of four young Hen Harriers from the Duhallow Region of East Kerry and North Cork, which began in 2012, can be followed on an almost daily basis, with updates on their progress and individual stories available on the project website henharrierireland.blogspot.com

The information and data derived from the satellite trackers will build on the picture of Hen Harrier movements and survival already presented by a collaborative wing-tagging project between NPWS, IRSG and UCC. In addition, the stories of the individual harriers themselves, named by the local school children of Duhallow, will help foster a greater awareness and understanding of Hen Harriers among the general public.

Click here for the latest on the Hen Harrier project and the bird’s movements. For more information on Hen harriers and the work that we are doing contact the LIFE project at IRD Duhallow at 029-60633 or alternatively you can visit our LIFE Project website here. You can also follow Hen Harrier Ireland on Facebook – www.facebook.com/henharrierireland and Twitter @HarrierIreland

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